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This year's "Reflections of Research" competition, run by the British Heart Foundation, selects "The Forming Heart" by Dr Richard Tyser as the Judge's runner-up

This image by Dr Richard Tyser, a BHF-funded research fellow at our department, shows the heart in a developing mouse embryo.

The heart cells are coloured in red. During early development, the heart forms this crescent-like shape and starts to beat.

The British Heart Foundation competition "Reflections of Research" looks for the best images relating to research into heart and circulatory diseases, blending science and art.

Many congratulations are in order to Dr Tyser on being awarded runner-up. 

More information on the competition featuring the image can be found on the BBC News website.

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