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Genome manipulation in the mouse via microinjection of CRISPR/Cas9 site-specific nucleases has allowed the production time for genetically modified mouse models to be significantly reduced. Successful genome manipulation in the mouse has already been reported using Cas9 supplied by microinjection of a DNA construct, in vitro transcribed mRNA and recombinant protein. Recently the use of transgenic strains of mice overexpressing Cas9 has been shown to facilitate site-specific mutagenesis via maternal supply to zygotes and this route may provide an alternative to exogenous supply. We have investigated the feasibility of supplying Cas9 genetically in more detail and for this purpose we report the generation of a transgenic mice which overexpress Cas9 ubiquitously, via a CAG-Cas9 transgene targeted to the Gt(ROSA26)Sor locus. We show that zygotes prepared from female mice harbouring this transgene are sufficiently loaded with maternally contributed Cas9 for efficient production of embryos and mice harbouring indel, genomic deletion and knock-in alleles by microinjection of guide RNAs and templates alone. We compare the mutagenesis rates and efficacy of mutagenesis using this genetic supply with exogenous Cas9 supply by either mRNA or protein microinjection. In general, we report increased generation rates of knock-in alleles and show that the levels of mutagenesis at certain genome target sites are significantly higher and more consistent when Cas9 is supplied genetically relative to exogenous supply.

Original publication

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0169887

Type

Journal article

Journal

PloS one

Publication Date

12/01/2017

Volume

12

Pages

e0169887 - e0169887

Addresses

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Keywords

Zygote, Animals, Mice, Transgenic, Mice, Mutagenesis, Pregnancy, Maternal-Fetal Exchange, Mutation, Transgenes, Models, Biological, Female, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats