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The association between thrombosis and acute coronary syndromes is well established. Inflammation and activation of innate and adaptive immunity are another important factor implicated in atherosclerosis. However, the exact interactions between thrombosis and inflammation in atherosclerosis are less well understood. Accumulating data suggest a firm interaction between these two key pathophysiologic processes. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1, have been implicated in the thrombotic cascade following plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, cell adhesion molecules accelerate not only atheromatosis but also thrombosis formation while activated platelets are able to trigger leukocyte adhesion and accumulation. Additionally, tissue factor, thrombin, and activated coagulation factors induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as prostaglandin and C reactive protein, which may further induce von Willebrand factor secretion. Treatments targeting immune activation (i.e. interleukin-1 inhibitors, colchicine, statins, etc.) may also beneficially modulate platelet activation while common anti-thrombotic therapies appear to attenuate the inflammatory process. Taken together in the context of cardiovascular diseases, thrombosis and inflammation should be studied and managed as a common entity under the concept of thrombo-inflammation.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.07.027

Type

Journal article

Journal

Atherosclerosis

Publication Date

02/08/2020

Volume

309

Pages

16 - 26

Keywords

Atherosclerosis, Cardiovascular disease, Cytokines, Inflammation, Platelets, Thrombosis