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An image from Radcliffe Department of Medicine researchers has been voted the supporters favourite in the annual British Heart Foundation 'Reflection of Research' image competition.

The competition aims to showcase cutting-edge heart and circulatory disease research by using captivating images, and DPhil students Cheryl Tan and Maryam Alsharqi, together with Drs Winok Lapidaire, Mariane Bertagnolli and Adam Lewandowski created a winning image representing the complex interactions between the heart and the brain. The image (main picture) portrays some of the different imaging techniques that researchers at the CCRF, OCMR and other places across the University use to investigate this relationship. These include magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and brain, ultrasound imaging of the heart and immunofluorescence imaging of the heart and blood vessel cells. 

Read more (Radcliffe Department of Medicine website) 

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