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Researchers shortlisted for Young Investigator Award, with three wins

RDM researchers have been making their presence felt at the European Society of Cardiology conference this year,  pictured are (left to right) Drs. Naveed Akbar, Jillian Simon, Parag Gajendragadkar, Betty Raman and Evangelos Oikonomou, all of whom were shortlisted for this year's Young Investigator Award. The annual meeting has around 11,000 abstracts submitted, 4,500 for the Young Investigator Awards, which are decided by blinded review from independent judges, with the four top-scoring abstracts being selected for presentation.

After this intense competition, Dr Raman went on to win the Coronary Pathophysiology and Microcirculation Award, while Dr Oikonomou won the clinical research Young Investigator Award, and Dr Gajendragadkar won the population science Young Investigator Award. Drs Akbar and Simon were the runners-up in the Basic Science and Coronary Pathophysiology category. 

Many congratulations to all our young scientists: very well done!

 

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