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The New Year Honours 2024 Lists have been published, marking the achievements and service of extraordinary people across the UK, including Professor Molly Stevens

© David Vintiner

Professor Molly Stevens FRS FREng, John Black Professor of Bionanoscience at the Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics and the Institute for Biomedical Engineering, has been appointed Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (DBE) for services to Medicine. She is also the Deputy Director of the Kavli Institute for Nanoscience Discovery.

Professor Stevens obtained her PhD at the University of Nottingham, did her postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and led a highly interdisciplinary research programme at Imperial College London from 2004-2023 where she still holds a part-time position. She has won 40 awards, including the Novo Nordisk Award in 2023, the MRS Mid-Career Researcher Award in 2022, and the American Chemical Society Award in Colloid Chemistry in 2020.

Professor Stevens is a Fellow of eight Professional Bodies, including The Royal Society (FRS) and Royal Academy of Engineering (FREng), and is also a Foreign Member of the National Academy of Engineering and an International Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Stevens said: ‘I would like to thank my incredible team of researchers and staff who inspire me every day towards the mission of transforming healthcare through biomaterials technologies. All the advances that we have made into the design of new biosensing, therapeutics and regenerative medicine technologies are the result of strong teamwork both inside the lab and through to our external collaborators and key industrial partners. A key focus has been, and will continue to be, designing effective yet accessible technologies that can help in democratising access to healthcare.’

Professor Irene Tracey, Vice Chancellor, University of Oxford commented: ‘Many congratulations to my Oxford colleagues who are recognised in the New Year Honours list 2024. Their outstanding achievements and service of people across the UK and the world continue to be a source of pride and inspiration for us all.’

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