Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The weeks and months after a baby is born are a critical time for the growth of the heart of premature babies. This is largely because they are faced with major blood flow changes and increased oxygen demands as they transition to the outside environment during a time where they would normally be developing inside their mother.

A lot of research has identified preterm birth (born before 37 weeks gestation) as a risk factor for developing early heart disease, including heart failure. Heart failure is when the heart can’t pump blood around your body as effectively as it should.

Several studies have shown that preterm birth is linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of their heart, yet the extent and evolution of these changes throughout development, from birth to adulthood, are not well defined. However, it’s important that they are defined as one in ten people worldwide are born preterm.

In our latest study, we performed a meta-analysis of data from published studies that compared the heart’s structure and function using echocardiography or cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for people born preterm versus those born at term.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Dr Adam Lewandowski, Radcliffe Department of Medicine.

Oxford is a subscribing member of The ConversationFind out how you can write for The Conversation.

Similar stories

Richard Tyser and Jack Miller honoured by the British Society of Cardiovascular Research

Dr Richard Tyser is this year’s winner of the Bernard and Joan Marshall Early Career Investigator Prize, and Dr Jack Miller has received a runner-up award, at the British Society of Cardiovascular Research Autumn Meeting.

Xin Sun shortlisted in national science image competition

DPAG Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Xin Sun has been shortlisted in the British Heart Foundation’s (BHF) annual ‘Reflections of Research’ image competition.

Reducing fat in the diabetic heart could improve recovery from heart attack

New research from the Heather Group has shown that in type 2 diabetes an overload of lipids reduces the heart’s ability to generate energy during a heart attack, decreasing chances of recovery.

Critical six-week window to ‘reset’ blood pressure after giving birth

Home blood pressure monitors could help mothers significantly lower high blood pressure after pregnancy