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Congratulations are in order to Professor Manuela Zaccolo on being elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology.

Professor of Cell Biology, Director of the Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Sciences Centre and Deputy Head of our Department Manuela Zaccolo has been made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology (FRSB).

The Fellowship is an accolade awarded to distinguished scientists who have made a prominent contribution to the advancement of the biological sciences.

 

I am honoured to receive this award. I hope to be able to contribute to the work the Society does to promote the life sciences and to inspire future generations of bioscientists. - Prof Zaccolo

The Royal Society of Biology's mission is to be the single unified voice for biology. The Society advises the Government and influences policy, advances education and professional development, and is dedicated to engaging and encouraging public interest in the life sciences. 

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